Newsweek

10/27/2015 Ivermectin, Drug for Parasitic Diseases Developed by Nobel Prize Winners, Could Also Control Malaria

A drug used for several decades to treat tropical diseases could also be effective for preventing the transmission of malaria, according to new research.

The Wall Street Journal

10/27/2015 Nobel-Winning Drug May Help Fight Malaria

A drug used widely for years to treat tropical diseases may also help stop malaria from spreading, potentially offering a powerful new tool in the fight to eradicate one of the world’s leading killers, according to preliminary new research.

SciDev.net

10/26/2015 Signs of dengue virus reservoir in China

A strain of the virus that causes dengue fever is likely to be endemic to southern China, a study has found, challenging widespread views that all the country’s dengue is imported.

Deutsche Welle

10/12/2015 Dengue virus 'endemic' in China, say researchers

With India in the grip of a deadly dengue outbreak, a new study suggests the virus has also become endemic in neighboring China where it can persist year-round, increasing the risk of more frequent and severe outbreaks.

Lancet

10/01/2015 Myanmar given an international boost to eliminate malaria

Groups from across the Myanmar political spectrum met with US and international bodies to discuss tangible steps toward the elimination of malaria in the region. 

Roll Call

08/15/2015 Malaria as a Catalyst for Change in Myanmar

In Washington D.C., recently, more than a dozen senior officials and politicians from Myanmar, some from groups with histories of deep mutual distrust, joined together in an extraordinary effort: to eliminate malaria from their deeply fragmented country. This is move that could have a dramatic effect on the global fight against the deadly parasitic disease. 

The BMJ

08/07/2015 Myanmar ministers and opposition leaders agree plan to eliminate malaria by 2030

Three Myanmar government ministries—health, defence, and foreign affairs—met representatives of three of Myanmar’s ethnic minority communities and of the main opposition party, the National League for Democracy, at a conference held at the University of Maryland on 3 August. 

Devex

08/06/2015 In Myanmar, a global health threat breeds room for new cooperation

In a way, the fearful specter of resistance to artemisinin, a must-have drug in the battle against one of the world’s deadliest diseases, rising in remote and rugged northern Myanmar, has made clear that global health cooperation has to move faster than political consensus.

Miami Herald

07/01/2015 Study: Cases of 'fish poisoning' in Florida far more prevalent than reported

A new study conducted by University of Florida and the Florida Department of Health found that ciguatera strikes nearly 30 times more people than previously believed — with Hispanics among the most common victims to a toxin that can cause vomiting, nausea and, in the worst cases, paralysis.

Yahoo! Health

06/30/2015 The Freaky Fish-Borne Illness You've Never Heard Of

A new study published in the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene found that poisoning from ciguatera, a toxin that can make you sick when you eat certain types of fish, is 28 times more common than previous data suggests. The most recent estimate from the state of Florida found that one out of every 500,000 residents becomes sick from ciguatera poisoning each year, but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that only 2 to 10 percent of ciguatera cases are actually reported in the U.S.

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