Pictorial Presentation of Parasites by Herman Zaiman

Thanks to the generosity of Herman Zaiman and his family, ASTMH proudly presents “Pictorial Presentation of Parasites,” a famous collection of more than 2,000 slides of various vectors.

Dr. Zaiman, a longtime ASTMH member, spent his career as a radiologist and educator until retiring in 2000. He taught at Einstein College in New York. He also co-authored several medical texts, including "Photographic Case Studies in Gastroenterology: Diagnostic Tests for the Practitioner" in 1992. Additionally, his writing has appeared in journals such as the Journal of Histochemistry & Cytochemistry and the American Journal of Pathology.

His "Pictorial Presentation of Parasites" is a seminal image collection that will remain a valued resource for those in the tropical medicine and hygiene field for decades to come.

A seventy-one year old white male,  with a history of malaria 40 years earlier,  complained of weakness of three weeks duration following a vacation trip through Botswana,  South Africa in July and August of 1971.    During that trip he suffered many insect bites.    In September because of malaise,  chills and fever,  he started taking quinine.    A local physician subsequently prescribed quinine and Daraprim.    The chills and fever abated but weakness persisted. He became anorectic and lost weight. Physical examination in New York (Dr.  Hoskins) was remarkable for lethargy,   mild cnoephalopathy on HIP testing but no localizing signs,  bilateral,  cervical,  axilary and inguinal lymphadenopathy. Laboratory examination revealed slight anemia,  and motile trypanosomes in the; peripheral blood     The spinal fluid was clear,  opening pressure 130mm.   H2O,  4RBC,   33WBC, 84% mono,   16% sugar,   58% protein.    Twenty eight motile trypanosomes   / mm3 were seen in the counting chamber. The patient was treated with Suramin and Mel B (Arsobal) . The parasitemia disappeared,  the CSF cleared.    The patient probably suffered a transient reaction to Mel B (AS1)   with muscle weakness,  proximal more than distal with decreasing vibratory sense and fine tremor.  Higher power view of trypanosome in spinal fluid of same patient.

Trypanosoma rhodesiense

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Description: A seventy-one year old white male, with a history of malaria 40 years earlier, complained of weakness of three weeks duration following a vacation trip through Botswana, South Africa in July and August of 1971. During that trip he suffered many insect bites. In September because of malaise, chills and fever, he started taking quinine. A local physician subsequently prescribed quinine and Daraprim. The chills and fever abated but weakness persisted. He became anorectic and lost weight. Physical examination in New York (Dr. Hoskins) was remarkable for lethargy, mild cnoephalopathy on HIP testing but no localizing signs, bilateral, cervical, axilary and inguinal lymphadenopathy. Laboratory examination revealed slight anemia, and motile trypanosomes in the; peripheral blood The spinal fluid was clear, opening pressure 130mm. H2O, 4RBC, 33WBC, 84% mono, 16% sugar, 58% protein. Twenty eight motile trypanosomes / mm3 were seen in the counting chamber. The patient was treated with Suramin and Mel B (Arsobal) . The parasitemia disappeared, the CSF cleared. The patient probably suffered a transient reaction to Mel B (AS1) with muscle weakness, proximal more than distal with decreasing vibratory sense and fine tremor. Higher power view of trypanosome in spinal fluid of same patient.
Uploaded: 10/27/2015
Type: .jpg