Joseph Augustin LePrince Medal

In recognition of outstanding work in the field of malariology.

Joseph A. LePrince was born in Leeds, England, and came to the United States at age six. He received a degree in Civil Engineering from Columbia University. In 1901 he went to Havana to work with Major Gorgas, initially on a 60 day trial contract. First as Assistant to Gorgas, and later as General Inspector of the Department of Sanitation, he played a key role in turning the new discoveries into practical vector control measures. When Gorgas was assigned to the Canal Zone, LePrince accompanied him, where he became “Health Officer of the Strip.”

LePrince was the first person to control malaria by killing of mosquitoes in dwellings. After his outstanding work in the Canal Zone, LePrince began his service in the U.S. Public Health service in 1915. During WWI he had charge of malaria control activities around Army and Navy installations in the United States. In 1923 he went to Mexico to develop malaria control in the oil fields in that country. He was a charter member of the National Malaria Committee and a leading figure in the successful malaria eradication efforts in the southern U.S. He retired from the Public Health Service in 1939, and died in 1956. The first Joseph Augustin LePrince Medal was awarded in 1951 to LePrince himself.

2012
Carlos C. (Kent) Campbell
PATH Malaria Control Program

2009
Wilbur K. Milhous

2006
Stephen L. Hoffman
Thomas E. Wellems

2003
Craig Canfield

2000
Louis Miller

1997
Ruth Nussenzweig

1994
Wallace Peters

1991
William E. Trager
P.C.C. Granham

1988
David F. Clyde

1985
William E. Collins

1982
Leon H. Schmidt

1979
Paul F. Russell

1976
Martin D. Young

1973
Clay G. Huff

1970
R. Robert Coatney

1967
Arnoldo Gabaldon

1964
Don E. Eyles

1960
Justin Andrews

1957
Louis L. Williams, Jr.

1954
Brian Maegraith

1951
Joseph Augustin LePrince